3 Ways to Get Started with CloudPort – Using WSDL

As part 3 in this series. In the first we captured a service using CloudPort’s proxy feature, and in the second we created a service copying and pasting mostly. In this tutorial we use a SOAP service that has WSDL. SOAP services currently differ from REST based service in that they include WSDL that defines the structure and parameters if the message header and bodies. In this case, I will use the simple temperature convert SOAP service.

1. Start CloudPort and select Build Simulation. In the Capture WSDL bar enter the URL followed by ?wsdl or in our case paste

http://www.w3schools.com/webservices/tempconvert.asmx?WSDL

1. Capture WSDL
2. Change the Network Listener Policy – in my case I just changing the port to 8888 and will leave it on local machine, and commit.

2 listener

3. Now we can define any specific Request or Response values. You could build a VB script or create a random variable or any of a number of ways to match requests responses. In this case, our test coverage is 3 values.

  • 0 Fahrenheit response expected -17.7777777777778
  • 72 Fahrenheit response expected 22.2222222222222
  • 100 Fahrenheit Response expected 37.7777777777778

So lets start by cloning the FahrenheitToCelsius simulator 3 times and renaming it 0, 72, 100

3. Clone

4. Now we need to change the rules for inbound documents. The default rule recognizes any value. Right click on the actual value and select Add XML Element Value Criteria, Contains Value for each of the 3 cloned services.

4. Rule 1

5. Now selecting the rule allows for entering the value. Enter 0, 72, 100 in each of the clones services and Exact Match.

5. Rule

6. Now Select the Response tab, and enter the desired response value for each of the 3 clones simulators.

6 Response

7. If you want to test Celsius to Fahrenheit you can repeat this process.

8. Now launch your created simulation by selecting the green arrow icon Start Local Simulation. The Free Simulation player will launch and show you the URI and rules available. Select Copy Generated WSDL to Link icon. This is the listener we set up in step 2.

8 copy

9. In SOAPSonar now, paste that WSDL link into the Capture WSDL field and the 2 services are shown in the project tree.

10. Test the 3 services listed in point 3 now. Do you get the expected response?

9 soapsonar

 

 

 

 

SOAPSonar – Continuous Testing ideas

In this example, I am going to use a success criteria to monitor a specific field value for a given response, but there are many possible ways to implement continuous testing. To have a little fun, I am going to use a JSON weather services provided by http://api.openweathermap.org. Being the weather and this being Canada, there should be a lot of change.

Lets say you only interested in knowing if Rain is in the forecast for the next day. Lets set up a success criteria first that fails the test case should there be rain in the forecast. if you not done the introductory tutorial on Success Criteria please do so first.

1. File, New, Test Group. New JSON Test and Name it.  Paste the following in the URI

http://api.openweathermap.org/data/2.5/forecast/daily?q=Toronto&mode=jsonl&units=metric&cnt=1

and Set the method to GET. Commit and Send.

1 URI

2. Now All we want to know is if there is rain in the the forecast. Select Success Criteria tab, Add Criteria Rule and XPath Match.

2. Xpath

3. Now lets edit our XPath Match rule. By selecting it, we see the Graphical XPath, Scroll down till you see weather, main and select the value, right-click and Compare Element Value.

3 Element

4. Select tab Criteria Rules. Change the Force Action to Force Fail. and Match Function term to Rain. We now have a criteria rule that will fail the test case if rain is in the forecast. Drag it over to the Run View and Send. Did it fail? is there Rain in the forecast?

4. Rain

5. Now if we automate the test case and it fails, it should mean rain. So in Run View, select Create Command Line Script. (see pointer). you need to save the file first.

5 script

6. Now Lets Generate a Report, (One Page), call it rain and Email Report to the right address. We then need to define our email SMTP settings. On the second page, fill in the details for your email server and send test email.

6 automate

7. Lastly, let schedule as a a Task using the Windows Scheduler. Fill in details and OK.  If you want, you can go into windows scheduler to edit the task further. The test case uses standard windows scheduler.  On manually running it, I get a PDF report in my mailbox as an attachment.

7 Windows Scheduler

8. Note, I could also set up a Task in the response section to send me a email with some personalized note.

8 Task

This rather silly example is to show that you can automate a test case to run as frequently as you may want, to watch for a certain value in a certain  part of the response, that you defined as a success criteria. That could well be a response time, validation code or any other parameter, and need not be rain.

Questions, or Comments?

Conditional Test Cases

A recent customer request was to have a decision tree in an automation test. This is a more advanced tutorial, showing using global variables and decision trees.

Some reasons for wanting a decision tree could be as simple as saying, if a test fails, automatically run an additional set of tests, or more complexed, like saying, if a test returns a value in a given field, run an additional test or different test.

Lets use iTunes JSON service for this tutorial. Here I want to get a list of albums for a artist using the search feature.

1. Start SOAPSonar and lets create a new project. File, New Test Group, then File, New, JSON Test Case. Create 3 JSON tests cases (you can clone them). Name them Search, Lookup A, Lookup B.

1 Create test cases

2. Lets enter the queries. What I am going to do is a search first, then use the artist ID to get a list of Albums for that artist

  • Search A use http://itunes.apple.com/search?term=arctic+monkeys as the Query and GET as the method
  • Lookup A use http://itunes.apple.com/lookup?id=62820413&entity=album and GET as the method
  • Lookup B use http://itunes.apple.com/lookup?id=5893059&entity=album and GET as the method

2. URI

3. We need to define a global variable. Policy Settings (in project Tree), Project Globals, Project Global Variables and enter artist=1 (some initial value). We just defined a global variable called artist.

3. Global Variable

4. Now in Search, we define a Runtime variable for artistId. Look in the Response section, Runtime Variables, and scroll down till you see the artistId value. It should be 62820413. Right-click on the value and add variable reference. Leave the name as artisIsd and accept.

4 rt variable

5. Now we need to update our global variable with the runtime variable. Select the Tasks tab, then Actions, Update Global Variable.

5 Global

6. Now lets select the variable. Edit the Task created in 5, select artist and then right click and [RV]Runtime Variable and find and select artistId.

6 runtime

7. Its time to define our test case in Run View. Drag Search under Default group. Right-click on Search test and select Add Conditional Test Group.

7 Runview

8. Now we define the condition. Select Conditional Tests folder, then drag Lookup A and Lookup B under it.  Select Global Variable Match, enter artist (our global variable) and paste 62820413 for the value in Lookup A and  5893059 for the value in Look-up B. Commit and send.

8 Conditional

9. You should see that 2 Test cases were run. When we look at the results in report view, they search and Lookup A.

9 first scenario

10. Now lets change the search test from

http://itunes.apple.com/search?term=arctic+monkeys query

to http://itunes.apple.com/search?term=the+black+keys

Commit then switch to Run View and Run Suite. This time the second test was Look-up B.

10 alternate

Any questions or comments?

3 Ways to Get Started with CloudPort – Create

In the first in this series, we used an iTunes JSON service and made a request via SOAPSonar while we capture the request and response using CloudPort’s proxy feature. This is great when your service is developed and available, but what if the service you need does not yet exist or needs to be altered?

Since I am not developing a service, I am going to use SOAPSonar to make a request of the real service and get a response. Then I will simply copy this response and paste it into CloudPort (with a small edit) and set up the right listener policies.

1. We going to do a second iTunes JSON GET to list of  albums for a given artist. Starting with SOAPSonar (you can use the same or start a new project) lets Create Two New JSON Tests. Lets rename the first alt-J albums and second Black Keys albums. The queries are

If you wondering were this came from, I read the service description document and too the ID value from the artistic response from the previously used search service. Commit and Send both. Now we have the requests and responses.

1 soapsonar query

2. Open up CloudPort, you can create a new, or use the previous. Right-click on Tests and create 2 New JSON Simulators. Rename them alt-J Albums and Black Keys Albums.

1 New

3. Now we need to establish the end points and queries or listeners. Select Add manual Rule and set the listener Target to URL and the paste the /lookup?id=558262494&entity=album in as the URL. Ensure its set to Exists. Once you created the new rule, delete the old catch all rule. If you wondering were this came from, its everything we sent as a request after the http://itunes.apple.com/

3 Simulator

4. Now do the same for Black Keys setting the target URL this time to match /lookup?id= 5893059&entity=album and Exists. Notice there are a number of ways to identify a incoming request to and hence trigger a response.

4 simulater BK

5. If you are using a new project, you need to also set the Network Listeners. If you using the same project as in the capture tutorial this should exist. Make sure yours looks as below with Name, IP, Port 8888 and URI.

5. Network Listner

6. Now we need to set up the responses. There are two parts to each response the header and the body. Go back to SOAPSonar real query and copy and past the entire response header and body into CloudPort Response tab. Then commit.

6 copy

7. Do the same for the second Black Keys service for both header and response.

7 response

8. Now we could edit these, adding albums, changing structure or renaming things, but the bands may not be happy. So all I will add is a small change above wrapperType

“simulated”: “simulated using CloudPort”, (make sure you have the , for correct JSON notation)

to both. 

11. New service

9. Notice if you look at the Response Runtime Variables tab, if you response is correctly JSON formatted the graphical view will populate. If its is not, the response will still be sent, but you will not be able to use variables and the client may not understand your response.

9 graphical view

10. Lets test our newly created services. Launch the Simulation Player, by selecting the green arrow icon. Notice your listener URI and we now have 4 simulated services.

10 simulation player

11. Now clone the two real SOAPSonar services and change the requests to

Do you see the changes we made?

In this example we added one line or possible variable, but we could just have well created an entire service from scratch. Here is the zipped create simulation.

SOAPSonar – Testing SOAP, REST or JSON Services

” What is the difference Testing a SOAP Services vs. JSON/REST or other service using SOAPSonar” After trying to answer this question verbally 3 times in the last week, I thought it a good idea to show it in a post.

  • SOAP – “Simple Object Access Protocol” usually uses XML, and has WSDL. It also has an explicit error format or SOAP Fault messages. It tends to be heavier weight and services are often far larger.
  • REST – Representational state transfer is a software architectural style consisting of a coordinated set of architectural constraints applied to components, connectors, and data elements, within a distributed hypermedia system of which JSON is one language.
  • JSON – JavaScript Object Notation, uses readable text (not tue XML)to transmit data objects, consisting of attribute–value pairs. JSON does not use WSDL (Similar WADL is unpopular, in draft and seldom used), but usually uses a service description document. JSON Schema is also seldom currently used. JSON has no explicit error format. This makes JSON light weight and ideal for mobile applications.

So what does that really mean for someone using SOAPSonar?

The Difference

With a SOAP Service

You can use the capture WSDL bar and enter the URI, with ?wsdl afterwards and discover all the available services. Try it now with

http://www.w3schools.com/webservices/tempconvert.asmx?wsdl.

Notice the TempConvert and two services are automatically populated. When you select FahrenheitToCelsius_1, notice the Body is populated with field in SOAPSonar. If you enter a value, commit and send, you get your XML response.

1. WSDL
SOAPSonar offers a way to view the XML request, using the tab labelled XML and request headers. The same is possible in JSON, also headers tend to be lighter weight

2. XML

You can Also go to Documents and View Schema, which most likey does not exist in JSON

3. View Schema

With A JSON Service

There is no WSDL that can be captured and the chances are there is no schema. This means it is not possible for a Tester to automatically discover services in the same way. In SOAPSonar, we start by selecting File, New Test Group and then we have to name the test group. We can then Add a new test, by right-click, New JSON Test or more generic New REST Test and then naming each one.

5 New JSON

We then need a URI, the query parameters and the Method. Lets use

http://webservices.daehosting.com/services/TemperatureConversions.wso/FahrenheitToCelcius/JSON

as the URI and ?nFahrenheit=decimal as parameter to send and GET as the method. Then for 80 as the value, we replace Decimal with 80. How do I know this?, I read the document definition and example. The REST view in SOAPSonar would be as below. Notice the body of the request is frequently empty

6 REST View

The JSON view, is a single query line in the URI, and the Method. There is no WSDL to View and although incorrect queries will error, the description is limited.

7 JSON

So how then do Testers know what to Test? Its usually one of 4 ways
  1. The tester reviews the JSON code and looks for all URI, Methods and attribute–value pairs and reverse engineers tests cases. This takes significant JSON knowledge
  2. The Tester relies on the service description document, which should define all attribute–value pairs, Methods, URI’s and Query Strings. This requires good documentation.
  3. The developer and / or tester (Agile facilitates this) create and define the unit tests together. This unit test is then used to validate the basic functionality of the each function by both developer and tester. The tester, then adds ADS, chains functions, tests negative scenarios, load, and all additional aspects of the function to get the desired coverage
  4. You embrace yet to be standards of JSON Schema (tough given its level of maturity)

With JSON services, defining success criteria is also extremely valuable, due to the lack explicit error format. Its also far easier far developer to make minor changes to code, as they dont need to update schema, making regression testing important.

The Same

So now that we covered the differences, the rest is much of the same. Lighter weight JSON services tend to be much smaller and services and the very easy structure to understand. Be it SOAP or REST, SOAPSonar (and CloudPort) will identify all the variables and display them in the same manner.

Here is what that SOAP service looks like in graphical view for both request and response in the Runtime Variables tab. Any of these variables can now be used for chaining, automation data sources, success criteria, regression and a variety of testing options, using the right-click option.

4 Variable reference

Here is what the JSON service looks like for the graphical view for both request and response in the Runtime Variables tab. Any of these variables can also be used in the same way as SOAP, for chaining, automation data sources, success criteria, regression and a variety of testing options, using the right-click option.

8. JSON Vairables

If you wish to use a variable with SOAP, you right-click and add it in the field.

9 Query

If you wish to use a variable with JSON, you right-click and add it in the URI (or body occasionally) in the same way.

10 JSON Query

Conclusion

Yes there are differences testing SOAP vs. REST when using SOAPSonar. The lightweight nature of JSON, that makes it attractive, requires closer ties to development and more rigorous documentation in order to ensure that the service is being “discovered” and tested. This means Testing and Development need a clearly defined process, de-mark, deliverables and co-operation between developers and testers.

I hope this helps those QA professionals as that are now testing JSON vs SOAP services to adapt to the changes quicker. Questions, Comments?

10. SOAPSonar – Distributing Load Testing Geographically

Physically distributing the location of load test clients has 2 benefits. Firstly, it overcomes the limitations of network segment and  works station resources. Secondly it allows for the testing and understanding of the impact of network and location on load and performance.

Yes, you could run around, call different people and press the button at the same time, but integrating the test results can then be very difficult. Triggering a load test from a single central instance, across multiple physical machines, and centralizing the report generates a single drill down report.

In my previous tutorial we load tested using 3 virtual machines, using only one physical machine – SOAPSonar. This tutorial carries on were that one ended, so please do tutorial 9 first if you have not. This tutorial will now distribute the same test across multiple physical machines or “agents”

1. Check to make sure you still running the CloudPort Runtime and Performance Test Tutorial is loaded. this will be the service we will load test against. Confirm the IP address and URI.1 runtime

2. Launch SOAPSonar and go back into Project view and just run a quick Send request to server to make sure it is all working still. This confirm your [ADS] is in place and your runtime is up and URI is right.

2 SOAPSonar

3. Now we need to download our Physical Agent client software. Select Agents in the Top menu (next to help) then Download SOASPSonar Agent Installer. Your browser should launch and you should be able to download the latest agent by selecting it. Its important to keep your SOAPSonar Release and the Agent on the same release. Install the agent on your own machine or another if you would prefer.

5. Agent port

4. Run the agent software after installation and select File, Preferences.

4 agent preferences

5. Confirm your port and Select Log Individual Agent Run Events. You should now see CloudPort and Agent in your task bar.

3 Download

5.1 taskbar

6. Now we need to tell SOAPSonar that we have a agent available.  In SOAPSonar select Configure, Agents.

6 Agents

7. Select the Icon for add a New Agent, Give it a name that so you remember were it is. (like Montreal, Vancouver, Halifax, London or in my case James Bond). Then the IP address of the Agent (in my case its local so 127.0.0.1) and confirm the same port we checked in 5 above. Select OK. We now have a Agent to use along with our local instance in load tests. The idea is not to have it on the same machine for load tests, and preferably on a different network segment, but this is just a tutorial on how.

7 james

8. Now switch to Run View, and we should still have the same DefaultGroup and Group Performance Settings from the previous tutorial. Select Performance Loading Agents. Select Import Default Agent Definitions icon and your agent should be shown. Activate it by selecting the Red dot to Green. Commit settings to save your agent. 

8 activate

9. Now all we have to do is allocate how many virtual users to each agent. You have both your local SOAPSonar instance or Local Agent and then the new one we created. Select Group Performance Settings and change the Virtual Clients to 4. Then right next to that, select the icon for Agent Thread Allocation.

9 Add Virtual

10. Lets give 2 Virtual Agents to each of or physical agents. Confirm duration is 3 seconds and Commit and Run Suite.

10 alocate

11. You should now see the Agent Initialization Screen. Once the agent is initialized, select Start Test. If your agent does not initialize, check the IP address and Port and ensure you can ping the agent.

11 Agent initialize

12 In the Real-Time Monitor, you see you can now view performance by physical agent.

12 Real time

13. In Report View, you can now show performance for one Physical Agent, One Virtual Agent or aggregated. This allows to to compare performance from one physical location to another.

13 Repaort

Conclusion

Distributed agents is part of the Server Edition of SOAPSonar, along with expanded number of virtual users. Physical Load agents allows performance testing to scale through distributing the agents and resources. It also allows for testing of network infrastructure as well and application performance. Using the same Test Suite again as we use for functional testing, regression and performance to save time and be easily automated.

This is the end of the introductory series of Tutorials. If you doing a trial and just looking for a high level understanding how SOAPSonar can help you, you should be on your way. From time to time I will post new tutorials on new features, different options and greater challenges. Other features not as of yet used.

In the mean time, let us know how you enjoyed these. Private comment in the form below and public by starting a discussion at the bottom of the page.

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Comment or suggestions always welcome.